Andrea Ferrero: Equity, Entrepreneurship, and Financial Literacy

Who is Andrea Ferrero, and what is Pockets Change?

ANDREA FERRERO brings over a decade of experience in teaching and learning, curriculum and program development, and community capacity building together to design award winning educational programs and digital products. She holds a teaching credential in PreK-12th grade multiple subjects and two Master’s degrees in Educational Leadership and Curriculum & Instruction with Multicultural Contexts.

At Pockets Change, Andrea works with schools, organizations, and businesses to make finance fun through innovative educational approaches and meaningful ed-tech tools. She has served as a delegate to the World Innovation Summit in Qatar, the ASCD Supervision and Curriculum Development Delegation in China, the Multi-Age Learning Institute in New Zealand, and the Mozilla Open Leaders in England. Andrea is also a board member of the California Jump$tart Coalition.

⭐️ Use the timestamps below to jump to specific parts of this conversation in YouTube. ⬇️

  • 3:12 – It’s story time! Please share with us about a LOW MOMENT or an experience of adversity that you’ve faced in your teaching or education career, and describe how you overcame it.
  • 5:41 – As I mentioned off the top, you are the co-founder and executive director of POCKETS CHANGE. What is the mission and vision of your organization? How do you seek to serve schools and learners?
  • 7:52 – I’d like to focus in especially on this whole area of FINANCIAL LITERACY. Why do you think this is such a critical concern for our students today? What do you see as some of the most serious gaps in our typical high school education?
  • 12:39 – Does Pockets Change offer any ENTREPRENEURSHIP workshops or practical opportunities for small business training?
  • 14:21 – Outside of education, what’s another area of LEARNING for you? What is it that ignites your passions outside of the classroom and brings you alive as a human being? Tell us why this area interests you and why you enjoy it.
  • 15:44 – Share about one app, personal habit, PRODUCTIVITY hack that contributes to your success.

Voices and Resources That Spark Andrea’s Thinking

Follow Andrea

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Five Latina Superintendents: Building Equity During Times of Crisis

In this edition of the Roundtable, host Tim Cavey connects with five Latina superintendents who are providing bold leadership to school districts in California (and now Texas). We discussed wins during the pandemic, International Women’s Day, gender equity in education leadership, solutions to pandemic problems, self-care strategies, sources of inspiration, and more.

Select any of the timestamps listed below to jump to specific portions of the discussion. ⬇️

Questions and Timestamps from This Conversation

  • 0:24 – Who are you and what is your current CONTEXT in education?
  • 1:57 – Let’s honor your communities. What is one thing that you’re especially proud of in YOUR DISTRICT?
  • 10:27 – This week we celebrated Int’l WOMEN’S Day. What does it mean to see more women in places of leadership in education, and what work still needs to be done?
  • 21:48 – It’s been often repeated that COVID-19 has magnified the systemic INEQUITIES in education. How do you see your role in building EQUITY for all learners across your communities?
  • 34:44 – What is one other CHALLENGE that you’ve had to wrestle with this year? Tell us about your learning in this area.
  • 37:51 – We all know that the so-called WORK-LIFE BALANCE is a myth – especially during this year of additional challenge. What are some practices that you live by that keep your fire burning week after week?
  • 51:02 – Who are the voices and influences that INSPIRE you on a daily or weekly basis?
  • 55:23 – How can we CONNECT with you and support your work?

Follow These Education Leaders on Twitter

Listen to the Audio-Only Podcast Episode on Spotify

Catch the Next Teachers on Fire Roundtable LIVE

As of this post, I’m still appearing weekly on YouTubeFacebook, and Twitter at 8:00 a.m. Pacific/11:00 a.m. Eastern. I’d love to see you join us and would be happy to feature your questions and comments on the show!

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Assessment Practices: Building Sustainability, Equity, and Literacy (featuring ACBC)

In this edition of the Roundtable, host Tim Cavey connects with five educators from the Assessment Consortium of BC. The purpose of ACBC is “To foster growth in assessment literacy for educators in British Columbia that will lead to sustainable and equitable practices, benefiting learners from K to post-secondary.” Whether you’re a British Columbian educator or not, if you’re interested in learning more about assessment practices in K-16, this conversation is for you.

Select any of the timestamps listed below to jump to specific portions of the discussion. ⬇️

Questions and Timestamps from This Conversation

  • 0:30 – Who are you and what is your current context in education?
    • 0:38 – Who is Shannon Schinkel?
    • 1:44 – Who is Nina Pak Lui?
    • 2:14 – Who is Phil Stringer?
    • 3:06 – Who is Josh Ogilvie?
    • 4:00 – Who is Katie Marren?
  • 5:07 – What is the Assessment Consortium of BC? How and why did ACBC start?
  • 7:53 – Why do you call it a consortium? What do you see as ACBC’s mission?
  • 12:18 – What is your personal assessment story? What sorts of experiences have shaped your thinking around assessment today?
  • 31:53 – Who are the voices who have inspired you and influenced your assessment journey?
  • 41:33 – What are your hopes for the launch and learn EdCamp event?
  • 44:46 – What is next for ACBC? What are some of your long-term GOALS?
  • 47:48 – How can we connect with you and join your learning journey?

Follow These Educators and Founders of ACBC on Twitter

Assessment Authors and Speakers Recommended by the Panelists

  • Barbara Oakley
  • Benjamin Bloom
  • Brooke Moore
  • Carol Ann Tomlinson
  • Dustin Louie
  • Dylan Wiliam
  • Grant Wiggins
  • Henry Roediger III
  • Jan Chappuis
  • Jay McTighe
  • Jo Chrona
  • Jody Carrington
  • Judy Halbert
  • Katie White
  • Ken O’Connor
  • Leyton Schnellert
  • Linda Kaser
  • Mark A. McDaniel
  • Paige Fisher
  • Peter C. Brown
  • Peter Liljedahl
  • Rick Stiggins
  • Rick Wormeli
  • Shelley Moore
  • Starr Sackstein
  • Susan Brookhart
  • Thomas Guskey
  • Tom Schimmer

Listen to the Audio-Only Podcast Episode on Spotify

Catch the Next Teachers on Fire Roundtable LIVE

As of this post, I’m still appearing weekly on YouTubeFacebook, and Twitter at 8:00 a.m. Pacific/11:00 a.m. Eastern. I’d love to see you join us and would be happy to feature your questions and comments on the show!

Connect with the Teachers on Fire Podcast on Social Media

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The Tech Rabbi (Rabbi Michael Cohen): Creativity, Design, and Innovation in Education

Who is The Tech Rabbi, Michael Cohen?

RABBI MICHAEL COHEN is a designer, educator, creativity instigator, podcaster, YouTuber, speaker, and an Apple Distinguished Educator. He’s also the Director of Innovation at Yeshiva University of Los Angeles Boys High School and the author of Educated by Design: Designing the Space to Experiment, Explore, and Extract Your Creative Potential.

⭐️ Use the timestamps below to jump to specific parts of this conversation in YouTube. ⬇️

05:09 – It’s story time! Please share with us about a low moment or an experience of adversity that you’ve faced in your teaching or education career, and describe how you overcame it.

08:54 – I can’t say enough about your book, Educated by Design: Designing the Space to Experiment, Explore, and Extract Your Creative Potential. So many good directions we could go here, and it’s been fun to hear you discuss your ideas chapter by chapter on your podcast. But let’s start with this quote:

“We want our students to believe that they have the ability to create something incredible, but for that to happen, they must experience the freedom of authentic learning. Our students must be allowed to take risks and be given the space to experiment, fail, and try again.”

Can you talk more about what you mean by authentic learning? How can school leaders and teachers move their practices and thinking in this direction?

12:15 – You also wrote that “I believe that creativity is a mindset, not an art set.” I love that quote because I hear the growth mindset there – the ideas that our identities and capacities to learn are not fixed, that we all have creative capacity.

What is your word to students and educators who have decided that they are not creative people?

16:39 – How are you looking to grow professionally and improve your practice next year? Can you share about a specific professional goal or project that you’re currently working on?

19:55 – Outside of education, what’s another area of learning for you? What is it that ignites your passions outside of the classroom and brings you alive as a human being? Tell us why this area interests you and why you enjoy it.

20:38 – Share about one personal habit or productivity hack that contributes to your success.

Voices and resources that spark Michael’s thinking and ignite his practice:

On Twitter

EdTech Tools

Books

1. What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 – 10th Anniversary Edition: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World by Tina Seelig

2. Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts. by Brene Brown

YouTube Channels

Film

Follow The Tech Rabbi

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Hey Teachers, Let’s Model a Metacognitive Life

Three simple reflection questions are enough to sustain a lifetime of authentic learning.

Education is waking up to the power of self-reflection. It seems that when we ask our learners to actually reflect on their own learning journeys, VERY COOL THINGS HAPPEN.

They get involved in the process.

They take on some agency and assume some ownership.

They move from passive spectators to active participants.

And the results can be significant.

Professional growth for teachers requires agency and ownership, too.

Ironically, teachers can fall into the role of passive spectator just as quickly as students can.

We can find ourselves waiting to be taught by others. To be professionally developed. To be told our next steps forward.

Yes, it’s entirely possible for the very professionals dedicated to the industry of learning to learn very little at all. To cruise from year to year. To grow stagnant and stale, uncritical of our own practices, unconcerned with growth, or too content in safety to risk uncertainty of any kind.

Don’t hear me heaping judgment, because I’ve been there myself. For those of us who’ve been around for a decade or two, professional complacency has a certain stealth about it. Turn your back on it for long, and before you know it, you’re comfortable.

But it’s hard to learn when you’re too comfortable.

Three Big Questions

Some time ago, I was privileged to attend an assessment conference with three colleagues. As part of the conference, we were given the opportunity to tour a few local schools. We were profoundly impacted by what we saw.

One of the many things we took away from these school tours was that schools were using Three Big Questions to make learning visible throughout their entire buildings.

It’s so simple, really.

  • What am I learning right now?
  • How’s it going?
  • Where to next?

Students were involved, but teachers were too. And that gave me some big ideas for the 2019–2020 school year.

Student Self-Reflections on Seesaw

First, I decided to make these Three Big Questions a regular part of my classroom culture. I then asked my 8th grade students (at a different school at the time) to reflect on these questions on Seesaw every Friday.

(*If you’re a Seesaw teacher yourself and would like to try this activity, grab it here.)

So far, I’ve allowed students to reflect on any learning target(s) from any subject, and I’m always impressed by how thoughtfully they approach this exercise.

It’s a simple practice. The writing demands here are pretty tame. It feels safe, and it’s interesting to my students. All they have to do is be honest.

Their comments are usually enlightening, and my eyes are always opened when I hear about their challenges, their frustrations, and the wins they’re celebrating.

It’s an awesome practice.

One student reflection from last Friday

Teachers Can Reflect, Too

As a middle school, our staff team decided to begin the 2019–2020 school year by following the fantastic example at Holly Elementary in Ladner, BC, and building a bulletin board that modeled lifelong learning through the Big Three questions.

  • What was something that we were learning? It didn’t need to be academic.
  • How was that learning process going?
  • Where were we headed next?

Three Big Questions in My PLN

Encouraged by this activity, I then threw out the Three Big Questions to my PLN. I tweeted a challenge to educators in my professional learning network to tell me about their own learning journeys.

And they did.

I could go on with more examples, but you get the idea.

It was super fun, and an exercise that I think schools and learning communities everywhere would do well to build into their staff conversations, circle check-ins, and professional learning times.

Wouldn’t you want to know what your colleagues are learning? I find that so inspiring and energizing.

Back to You: Model That Metacognition

And so I leave the Big Three questions with you, lifelong learner and education professional.

  • What are YOU learning right now?
  • How is that going for you?
  • Where are you headed next?

Share your answers with your own learners, with your colleagues, and with your PLN.

Because learning is contagious.